Monthly Archives: February 2013

CSC-Snakes of the United States mission, Project Noah weekly report 02/22/2013

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Greetings Snake Lovers,

This week at Project Noah, the Snakes of the United States – Center for Snake Conservation (CSC) mission has had an addition of 24 new spottings bringing the total number of snake spottings to 1,363. We added 17 new members to the mission, bringing the total to 608 users. Thank you to everyone who has joined and is contributing to this important mission!

The Project Noah: CSC-Snakes of the United States Mission Spotting of the week is this very pretty little sharp-tailed snake by bwitzkestudio. The sharp-tailed snake is found in California, Oregon, Washington up into British Colombia. Although a common snake, it is seldom seen out in the open. It feeds upon slugs and other invertebrates, using its sharp tail to help stabilize its food.

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/17586366

Please consider becoming a Project Noah member (it is free) and help make the world a better and safer place by educating the world about snakes! (We do make provisions for sensitive species asking that you merely record the nearest large town/community.)

Our goal is conservation through education. Let’s see if we can build our membership before the spring CSC snake count so that we can educate more people. My challenge to you is to get at least 2 friends to join Project Noah, post to the Snakes of the Untied Snakes mission and the get them to challenge 2 of their friends to do the same! Snakes are often unnecessarily feared and we can help change the human perception through our postings on Project Noah. http://www.projecthoah.org

Happy Herping!

Lisa~

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CSC-Snakes of the United States mission, Project Noah weekly report 02/15/2013

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What a pleasure and great honor to be featured by the CSC in one of the “Women and Snake ” features. Back when I was in college there were very few women in my field of herpetology and those who were mostly dealt with amphibians. It is such an awesome thing today to see strong, beautiful, smart women who love snakes! And so nice to know that future generations will not even give it a second thought to have women herpetologists that work with snakes!

This week at Project Noah, I am happy to report that the Snakes of the United States – Center for Snake Conservation (CSC) mission has had an addition of 10 new spottings bringing the total number of snake spottings to 1,339. I am also pleased to report we added 7 new members to the mission, bringing the total to 591 users.

The Project Noah: CSC-Snakes of the United States Mission Spotting of the week is this fantastic photo of a juvenile Western Cottonmouth. Often portrayed as aggressive, it has been my experience that they are anything but aggressive and do everything to try and let you know they are present and want to be left alone.

Congratulations and thanks to CSC-Project Noah member nspired.creation

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/15456030

Please consider becoming a Project Noah member (it is free) and help make the world a better and safer place by educating the world about snakes! (We do make provisions for sensitive species asking that you merely record the nearest large town/community. Our goal is conservation through education.

The Center for Snake Conservation needs your help to collect distributional data for all wild snakes in the United States. Please record all snakes including any snakes found dead on a road or elsewhere. Please include additional information about your spotting that can help us understand a bit more about the snake. As we collect spottings, we can increase our knowledge about snakes and help educate others that view our photos. Snakes are often unnecessarily feared and we can help change the human perception through our postings on Project Noah. http://www.projecthoah.org

http://www.snakeconservation.org/

And just a final shout out to the CSC for featuring women and snakes…what an inspirational feature!

Thanks, Lisa Powers

Project Noah – CSC Coordinator

CSC-Snakes of the United States mission, Project Noah weekly report 02/08/2013

Hi Folks,

I took a couple weeks off since snake spottings were slow and I needed to get organized for the coming field season. Project Noah and the CSC are planning some exciting features and events for the coming year! I am also pleased to announce that Project Noah won a couple of prestigious worldwide honors! Project Noah is the #1 educational app in the world! We are very excited to announce that we have been chosen as Global Champion for the m-Learning & Education category at the World Summit Awards held in Abu-Dhabi. We also picked up an award for being one of the 5 finalists in this category. And with terrific partners like the Center for Snake Conservation, we are certainly sure to garner more positive recognition in the future.

This week at Project Noah, I am pleased to report that the Snakes of the United States – Center for Snake Conservation (CSC) mission has had an addition of 53 new spottings bringing the total number of snake spottings to 1,329. I am also pleased to report we added 36 new members to the mission, bringing the total to 584 users.

The Project Noah: CSC-Snakes of the United States Mission Spotting of the week is this fantastic photo of a northern copperhead curled up on a timber rattlesnake at a hibernaculum in Georgia. These snakes often den together for the winter and may also cohabit with some nonvenomous species.

Congratulations and thanks to CSC-Project Noah member DantheMan!

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/17531093

Please consider becoming a Project Noah member (it is free) and help make the world a better and safer place by educating the world about snakes! (We do make provisions for sensitive species asking that you merely record the nearest large town/community. Our goal is conservation through education.

The Center for Snake Conservation needs your help to collect distributional data for all wild snakes in the United States. Please record all snakes including any snakes found dead on a road or elsewhere. Please include additional information about your spotting that can help us understand a bit more about the snake. As we collect spottings, we can increase our knowledge about snakes and help educate others that view our photos. Snakes are often unnecessarily feared and we can help change the human perception through our postings on Project Noah. http://www.projecthoah.org

http://www.snakeconservation.org/

And just a final shout out to the CSC for featuring women and snakes…what an inspirational feature!

Thanks, Lisa Powers

Project Noah – CSC Coordinator

Women and Snakes – February 7, 2013

Nonie Celeste – Florida
Nonie is the owner and wildlife educator at Nonie’s Ark Animal Encounters where she reaches out to schools, birthdays, festivals, and other places with lots of children with live animal presentations including snakes.  Nonie’s approach to snake education programs is to limit class size for every part…icipant has a very hands experience – it works!  Nonie is also a Center for Snake Conservation member and very involved in snake inventories along the panhandle of Florida.  In particular she is helping to document new and confirm historical localities for indigo snakes on federal government properties.  Nonie is pictured below with an indigo, scarlet snake, and teaching with a ball python.
Conservation Through Education www.snakeconservation.org

Women and Snakes – February 6, 2013

Shelly Cox – Missouri

Shelly is an educator at the Missouri Department of Conservation where she reaches out to children and adults of all ages with live animal presentations including snakes. In addition to her typical outreach programs she also hosts an annual event called the “Herp-O-Rama” each summer which is dedicated to educating people about reptiles and amphibians. Shelly is also a member of the Center for Snake Conservation and manages and generates content for our Facebook page.  Shelly has recently begun her own study of Timber Rattlesnakes on her farm in Missouri using mark and recapture techniques.  This study is just in its beginning but has already yielded exciting finds such as the neonate rattlesnake below.  Shelly is pictured with one of her star students below with a ratsnake and by herself with a fox snake.

Women and Snakes – February 5, 2013

Mandy Johnson – South Carolina

Mandy is a educator who brings her passion for all life including snakes to anyone she comes in contact with everyday.  As a kayak guide in the swamps and marshes of South Carolina, Mandy meets many “city folks” who have never seen a snake outside of a cage or book.  Her passion for snakes has brought her to catch snakes and introduce her clients to their wonderful natural history which helps dispel myths that snakes chase people and jump into their boats.  Mandy is also an excellent photographer and active Center for Snake Conservation member who freely shares her experiences with the CSC community.  As the kayak season begins, watch out for some of her amazing photos.  Here Mandy is pictured with a ratsnake and rainbow snake.

Women and Snakes – February 4, 2013

Melissa Amarello – socialsnakes.org

Melissa is Social Snakes.  As a volunteer following her graduate degree working at The Nature Conservancy’s Muleshoe Ranch in Arizona, Melissa has dedicated herself to educating people about the social behavior of snakes.  In particular, she is working closely with Arizona Black Rattlesnakes and their amazing social behaviors not just at the hibernacula but throughout their entire activity season.  She is using time-lapse photography and video to unravel the mysteries of these incredible but misunderstood snakes.  You can learn more about Melissa’s work and her mission “to promote understanding and appreciation of snakes by educating the public about their behavior” at www.socialsnakes.org.

Women and Snakes – February 2, 2013

Victoria Hodges – Commerce City, Colorado

Victoria is an educator in Commerce City’s afterschool and summer programs.  She also had an extreme fear of snakes that originated from a lack of exposure and understanding.  She also understood that as an “educator” she needed to overcome her fears not only for herself but for her students and their education.  She cautiously watched our program from outside the classroom but soon found herself drawn to the snakes.  Before we left, Victoria conquered her fear to the cheers of her students by holding a sand boa.  Thank you Victoria for stepping up as an example for our children and teachers.

Women and Snakes – February 1, 2013

Heather Young – Center for Snake Conservation

Heather is the “behind the scenes” support, organizational wizard, and accountant for the Center for Snake Conservation.  Her unwavering support and tolerance for the CSC’s Founder and his propensity to disappear into the field searching for snakes has ensured the early success of the CSC.  Although you will rarely see her with snakes, Heather is a strong supporter of their conservation and educating children and adults about their fascinating life histories.  You can help support her efforts for snake conservation by becoming a member of the Center for Snake Conservation today.

February is “Women and Snakes” Month

The Center for Snake Conservati0n has dedicated February to the women who study snakes or educate people about their amazing natural histories.  Each day, we will briefly highlight one woman, what she is doing for snake conservation, and how you can help her achieve her goals for snake conservation.

Do you know of an extraordinary woman who is making huge strides in snake conservation?  If so, please nominate her to become one of our daily features so we can help her achieve her goals by spreading the word about her research, educational program, or conservation effort.  Email your nomination along with a photo of them in action to info@snakeconservation.org for consideration.

Unnamed participant at a Center for Snake Conservation Educational Program – July 2011