Author Archives: Froghaven Farm

Snake Fungal Disease and Project Noah update

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Greetings Snake Lovers,

For many of us here in the northern hemisphere, snake spottings will be few and far between for the next month or so. But please be on the lookout when you are out and about, as snakes that are ill will often come out and bask on sunny days. With the uncertainty of how widespread and how it is going to effect snake populations, it is important to be aware of Snake Fungal Disease and identify possibly infected snakes. Swabbing and culture is the only sure fire way to be certain. But documenting unusual behavior can help alert biologists to areas that need to be checked. To learn more about Snake Fungal Disease: http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/other_diseases/snake_fungal_disease.jsp

Project Noah and the Center for Snake Conservation are active partners in helping with the conservation of snakes. It is our goal to educate people about the need and importance of snakes and ways to safely observe them. We hope you’ll support us on this mission by joining Project Noah today and adding your snake spottings to the Snakes of the United States -CSC mission.

This week finds our Project Noah-CSC SNakes of the United States mission at 2707 spottings. We now have 1091 PN users, an addition of 27 new members. Thank you to all who have contributed!

Our spotting of the week is this beautiful environmental portrait by PN member AshleyT

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/40001007

Happy Herping,

Lisa

CSC – Project NOAH Update

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As winter approaches here in the northern hemisphere, many of our snakes become less active. But some of the smaller species are more often observed at this time of year. Because they have a much smaller mass to heat up, they can move about more readily during cooler temperatures. These smaller snakes are often mistakenly identified as baby snakes (occasionally it is a baby snake) by people who have found them out foraging in the cooler weather. Earthsnakes, wormsnakes, Dekay’s brownsakes, ring-necked and red-bellied snakes (seen above) are often much easier to find at this time of year. So keep your eyes peeled and remember…the herping ain’t over just because it is a little cooler out.

Please join me in wishing CSC founder and executive director Cameron Young a very Happy Birthday! We hope you will have many more to come too!

Project Noah and the Center for Snake Conservation are active partners in helping with the conservation of snakes. It is our goal to educate people about the need and importance of snakes and ways to safely observe them. We hope you’ll support us on this mission by joining Project Noah today and adding your snake spottings to the Snakes of the United States -CSC mission.

This week finds our Project Noah-CSC SNakes of the United States mission at 2679 spottings. We now have 1064 PN users, an addition of 63 new members. Thank you to all who have contributed!

Our spotting of the week is this beautiful environmental portrait by PN member JeffreyDuby of a Florida banded water snake.

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/44266022

CSC – Project NOAH Fun Fact

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Project Noah
Fun Fact: The timber rattlesnake was one of the first symbols of the United States of America. Ben Franklin once wrote of the rattlesnake, “I recollected that her eye excelled in brightness, that of any other animal, and that she has no eye-lids. She may therefore be esteemed an emblem of vigilance. She never begins an attack, nor, when once engaged, ever surrenders: She is therefore an emblem of magnanimity and true courage.”

Timber rattlesnake spotted by PN member and herpetologist LisaPowers (Please be sure to look at the whole series):http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/38495226

If you live in the United States and want to know how to tell venomous from nonvenomous snakes, please read our PN Blog:

http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/31728621331/venomous-or-nonvenomous

 

Please remember to upload your spottings for snake week!

CSC – Project NOAH Snake Count Continues through Sunday

 

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Snake week ends this coming Sunday, but that doesn’t mean you have to stop admiring the beauty they bring to the world. Please enjoy the video below and remember to keep fighting for snakes everywhere.

Please enjoy this Project NOAH blog on Fassscinating Sssnakes!

http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/32121337669/my-fascination-with-snakes

CSC – Project NOAH

 

 

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As snake week continues, we want to remind you to remember to send in your data. The Snake Count is a first step towards understanding the conservation needs of snakes.  We need your help to make it successful.  We are excited to partner with Project Noah (www.projectnoah.org) to help collect and manage data.  Project Noah is a GREAT tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.  Sign up and download their free smartphone app today.  Do not worry; we will still accept data via email, our online webform, or hardcopy if you do not have a smartphone or GPS.  This count is going to be incredible!  Check out the FAQ page on www.snakecount.org to help you have a great Snake Count.  This next week will be a very exciting one here at the CSC and I sincerely hope you can share in our excitement!

Our featured Project NOAH snake today, finds us traveling the globe to the Philippines where the unusual and totally aquatic little wart snake lives. Be sure to check out the series of photos by PN member ZebulonHoover.

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/19737134

One of the wonderful things about Project NOAH is the opportunity to see amazing animals and plants from around the world and to connect with the people who spotted them.  In one of our blogs last year, herpetologist Aaron Goodwin explored, ” Snakes in Mythology, Religion and Folklore”. Check out the link below to learn more:

http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/31794894395/snakes-in-mythology-religion-and-folklore

Thanks,

Lisa Powers

CSC – Project NOAH Cool Photo Series

Snake Week is here!

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Check out this fabulous series of an Eastern Hog-nosed Snake by Project NOAH member TylerGraden at:  http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/27267251

The Snake Count is a first step towards understanding the conservation needs of snakes.  We need your help to make it successful.  We are excited to partner with Project Noah (www.projectnoah.org) to help collect and manage data.  Project Noah is a GREAT tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.  Sign up and download their free smartphone app today.  Do not worry; we will still accept data via email, our online webform, or hardcopy if you do not have a smartphone or GPS.  This count is going to be incredible!  Check out the FAQ page on www.snakecount.org to help you have a great Snake Count.  This next week will be a very exciting one here at the CSC and I sincerely hope you can share in our excitement!

CSC-Project NOAH Fall Snake Week

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As snake week begins, I thought it would be a good idea to revisit some of our past blogs. This one discusses the why and how of a snake count.

http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/31585455533/snakes-alive-recording-snake-distribution-diversity

Want to know more about Fall Snake Week? Visit the CSC page for more information and commonly asked questions: http://www.snakeconservation.org/home/CSC-announcements/fallsnakecounthasbegun

CSC-Project NOAH Update: Over 1000 mission members and over 2500 spottings!

 

 

 

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Honduran Milksnake

Project Noah is an award-winning software platform designed to help people reconnect with the natural world. Our ultimate goal is to build the go-to platform for documenting all the world’s organisms, and through doing this we hope to develop an effective way to measure Mother Nature’s pulse. By developing tools to help the mobile masses share their encounters with nature, we are building a powerful force for crowdsourcing ecological data collection and an important educational tool for wildlife awareness and preservation.

PN and the Center for Snake Conservation are active partners in helping with the conservation of snakes. It is our goal to educate people about the need and importance of snakes and ways to safely observe them. We hope you’ll support us on this mission by joining Project Noah today and adding your snake spottings to the Snakes of the United States -CSC mission.

Remember to like our Facebook too!  https://www.facebook.com/projectnoah

See what the press has said about Project NOAH:

http://www.projectnoah.org/press

 

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This week finds our Project Noah-CSC SNakes of the United States mission at 2545 spottings. We now have 1001 PN users, an addition of 43 new members. Thank you to all who have contributed!

Our spotting of the week is this fascinating series by PN member rstillings of a Northern water snake feeding upon a catfish while a friend looks on:

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/26137081

Anaconda Jewel

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What do you get when you take 1 black cement mixing tub, a bunch of water hyacinths and duckweed, 2 geeky snake lovers and the word’s largest snake? A fabulous photo shoot of course! Fortunately since there were just the 2 of us, this green anaconda was a young one and only about 3 feet long. She was very strong even at this young size! But she could not have been any more pleasant to work with. She was very sweet, calm and gentle and seemed to enjoy the photo shoot while exploring the set!

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CSC-Project NOAH Update

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  It always surprises me when one of my non-snake loving friends sees a photo like the western coachwhip tail pictured above and says, “Wow, that is so cool.  You always make snakes look so beautiful.” All I have done is capture the beauty of the animal as I see it. Snakes are truly creatures of great beauty yet when we always post photos of them in defensive positions, all people think of is fear. Consider this a challenge to put more art in your snake photos!

This week finds our Project Noah-CSC SNakes of the United States mission at 2478 spottings.. We now have 958 PN users, an addition of 19 new members.

Our spotting of the week is this gorgeous Speckled Rattlesnake by member TorreyNeel

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/31071275