Snakes of the United States Project Noah Mission – January 11, 2013 Update

This week at Project Noah, I am pleased to report that the Snakes of the United States – Center for Snake Conservation (CSC) mission has had an addition of 12 new spottings bringing the total number of snake spottings to 1,259. I am also pleased to report we added 9 new members to the mission, bringing the total to 535 users.
Please consider becoming a Project Noah member (it is free) and help make the world a better and safer place by educating the world about snakes! (We do make provisions for sensitive species asking that you merely record the nearest large town/community. Out goal is to conserve through education.
The Center for Snake Conservation needs your help to collect distributional data for all wild snakes in the United States. Please record all snakes including any snakes found dead on a road or elsewhere. Please include additional information about your spotting that can help us understand a bit more about the snake. As we collect spottings, we can increase our knowledge about snakes and help educate others that view our photos. Snakes are often unnecessarily feared and we can help change the human perception through our postings on Project Noah.www.projecthoah.org
Project Noah Snake Spotting of the Week
 
Florida Brownsnake – Storeria victa by Janson Jones
Many people would see a snake this size and automatically conclude that it is a baby snake. The fact is that many of our U.S. snakes get no bigger around than a number 2 pencil and may only reach a length of around a foot or less as adults. They are often secretive and spend much of the time underground, beneathe decaying logs/root balls or in leafy debris. The Florida brownsnake feeds on slugs, snails, and earthworms, but occasionally eats small fishes, frogs, and salamanders.
Last week at Project Noah, I am pleased to report that the Snakes of the United States – Center for Snake Conservation (CSC) mission has had an addition of 17 new spottings bringing the total number of snake spottings to 1,247. I am also pleased to report we added 16 new members to the mission, bringing the total to 526 users.
 
If you are a Project Noah member and wish to help us improve the database by recruiting new members and spottings to the CSC mission, please email Lisa Powers: froghavenfarm@hotmail.com
Project Noah Snake Spotting of the Week
 
Western diamond-backed rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). The color pattern generally consists of a dusty looking gray-brown ground color, but it may also be pinkish brown, brick red, yellowish, pinkish or chalky white. This ground color is overlaid dorsally with a series of 24-25 dorsal body blotches that are dark gray-brown to brown in color. Adults commonly grow to 120 cm (3.9 ft) in length, specimens over 150 cm (4.9 ft) are more rarely encountered. Western diamond-backed rattlesnakes are found in the United States from central Arkansas and southeastern California, south into Mexico. Life expectancy is more than 20 years, but is typically shorter because of hunting and human expansion. They are also heavily collected from the wild, frequently being drawn out of their hiding places with gasoline, and used in Rattlesnake Round-Ups where they are killed for entertainment

 

Lisa Powers
Froghaven Farm
www.froghavenfarm.com

Tell me and I forget; Show me and I remember; Involve me and I understand.
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About Center for Snake Conservation

The Center for Snake Conservation is a non-profit organization for the conservation of all snakes and their natural ecosytems. Our mission is to promote the conservation of snakes and their natural ecosystems and implement positive change in human attitudes towards snakes.

Posted on January 12, 2013, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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